New York Courts dot gov
New York StateUnified Court System

Human Trafficking Intervention Courts


Overview


According to the U.S. Department of State, over 17,000 trafficking victims are brought into the United States every year from foreign countries, while thousands more are trafficked within the United States. Victims are primarily women and children, particularly girls under the age of 18.

Despite New York legislation in 2007 that criminalizes sex trafficking, the court system continues to find that prosecutions under the trafficking statute remain relatively low. This is due, in large measure, to the difficulties in identifying and investigating these cases. In 2012, there were approximately 3,400 prostitution-related arrests* and only 40 arrests for sex trafficking.

The court system has responded to this issue by building upon the lessons learned in problem-solving courts, particularly domestic violence courts, and has developed dedicated tracks in Queens Criminal Court, Midtown Community Court, Bronx Community Solutions and Nassau District Court. These courts incorporate the key principles of problem-solving courts (i.e., specially-trained judges, judicial monitoring and linkages to services) to address the issues presented in these cases.

In addition, the Office of Policy and Planning is working closely with local courts to develop new strategies to identify and improve services for trafficking victims who enter the criminal and/or juvenile justice systems.

* This figure includes arrests for Prostitution (PL 230.00 & 230.03) and Loitering (PL 240.37). It does not include arrests for Patronizing a Prostitute (PL 230.04 & 230.05), Promoting Prostitution (PL 230.20 & 230.25), Compelling Prostitution (PL 230.33) or Permitting Prostitution (PL 230.40), Unauthorized Practice of a Licensed Profession (ED 6512).

back to top

Contact Info

For further information on Problem-Solving Courts or if you would like to schedule a court visit, please contact the Office of Policy and Planning at ProblemSolving@nycourts.gov