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New York StateUnified Court System

Administrative Rules of the Unified Court System & Uniform Rules of the Trial Courts


Rules of the Chief Judge


PART 34. Guidelines For New York State Court Facilities

34.0 Court facilities
34.1 Maintenance and operation standards for court facilities
34.2 Reimbursement for cleaning of court facilities
34.3 to 34.7 [Repealed]

Section 34.0 Court facilities.

In the exercise of responsibility for supervision of the administration and operation of the Unified Court System, the Chief Administrator of the Courts shall encourage, whenever possible and insofar as practicable, compliance with the guidelines for New York State court facilities set forth below.

GUIDELINES FOR NEW YORK STATE COURT FACILITIES

GUIDELINE I: SAFETY

I.1: Safety: Court facilities should have structural design, building materials, methods of construction and fire rating as required by local or state building codes that are applicable in the locality.

Court facilities should have fire alarms, fire extinguisher systems, means of egress and emergency exits as required by applicable building and fire codes.

The use of court facilities should conform, to the extent required, to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration Standards of the U.S. Department of Labor for public buildings.

I.2: Emergency Planning and Evacuation Procedures: Court facilities should have established procedures for the evacuation of facilities in case of fire or bomb threats, a system of communication in case of an emergency and the appointment of wardens to conduct fire drills at regular intervals. In addition, there should be safety officers to assure that required safety measures are established and followed at all times. A multicourt facility should have one safety officer with responsibility for the entire facility.

GUIDELINE II: ACCESS FOR THE HANDICAPPED

Court facilities should be accessible to the physically handicapped as required by Article 15 of the State's Executive Law and accepted architectural standards.

GUIDELINE III: ENVIRONMENT [FNa1]

III.1: Overall Appearance: Court facilities should have an overall appearance of dignity and efficiency.

The appearance of court facilities affects the attitude of litigants, attorneys, the public and court employees. Therefore, court facilities should be continuously well maintained.

III.2: Adequate Facilities and Areas: Court facilities should provide the required number of courtrooms, chambers, jury deliberation rooms, attorney/client conference rooms, clerical and other offices of adequate size as set forth below in these guidelines. An inadequate number of facilities delays the administration of justice.

III.3: Heating, Cooling and Humidity: Design should emphasize energy conservation. Court facilities should follow the standards set by the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE).

III.4: Ventilation: A fresh, contaminant-free air supply should be provided. ASHRAE standards should be followed.

III.5: Lighting: Court facilities should have adequate lighting levels that comply with the standards set by the Illuminating Engineering Society. Consideration should be given to energy conservation.

III.6: Color Scheme and Contrast: The color scheme should be sober and dignified, the colors easy to maintain. The following level of color contrast is suggested:

. Courtrooms

Low contrast

. Offices, jury rooms, conference rooms, chambers

Medium contrast

. Public lobbies, conference rooms, storage areas

Heavy contrast

III.7: Acoustics: Court facilities should provide a comfortable acoustical environment suitable for public trials, hearings, office work and research.

. There should be no vibration noise due to mechanical systems (heating, air-conditioning, elevators, plumbing, creaky staircases, doors, windows and mechanical equipment).
. Jury deliberation rooms and family court hearing rooms (courtrooms) should be soundproof.
. Courtrooms should be free from outside noise disturbance and should be so constructed as to assure that all the participants in the well area are able to hear the proceedings.
. Sound amplification may be necessary in large courtrooms, jury assembly areas, and large family court waiting rooms.


III.8: Vision and Sightlines: In courtrooms, every participant in the well area should have a clear and adequate view of all other participants.

Prisoner detention areas and prisoner travel path should provide clear and maximum vision for easy supervision of detainees.

III.9: Confidentiality: Functions which require a considerable degree of confidentiality--such as jury deliberation; attorney/client conferences; attorney/defendant interviews; conferences with judges, clerks and probation officers; and adoption proceedings--should be housed in private rooms.

III.10: Cleaning and Maintenance: Court facilities should be clean and hygienic. Floor, wall, ceiling, door and window components should be devoid of deterioration and in working condition. Electrical, plumbing, heating and cooling systems should be maintained in an operating condition.

GUIDELINE IV: SIGNS AND PUBLIC INFORMATION

IV.1: Exterior of the Building: The building should clearly be designated as a courthouse. If there are one or more courtrooms within a building housing other functions, it is particularly important that the existence of these courtrooms is made clear in a place easily seen by the public.

IV.2: Directory: Prominently displayed just within the main doors should be a building directory, bilingual where appropriate. There should be a listing of the location of courtrooms, court-related services, and ancillary agencies. If the courthouse functions are spread among a number of buildings, the courtroom services and the addresses of (and directions to) the other buildings should be posted.

IV.3: Door and Wall Signs: Signs should be posted at the door to each courtroom clearly identifying that part. In addition, directional wall signs, bilingual where appropriate, should be used in buildings where long corridors or confusing layouts indicate they would be useful.

IV.4: Information Service: Where possible, there should be information desks strategically placed in public areas of the courthouse and staffed where necessary by bilingual personnel to direct defendants and their friends and relatives, witnesses, jurors, and spectators to their destinations.

Where personnel are not available to establish such a service, consideration should be given to employing well-trained citizen volunteers.

If such a service is not established, there should be an office, such as that of the Court Clerk, designated as the place for the public to receive information and have their questions answered. Such public information offices should be clearly marked as such, and should be listed in the directory.

IV.5: Posting of Calendars: Copies of all daily part calendars in that courthouse should be posted at a central location, and each courtroom should have that room's calendar posted immediately outside.

GUIDELINE V: DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR PROPOSED COURTHOUSES

V.1: When to Build a New Courthouse: Building a new courthouse should be considered when:

A. The existing structure needs replacement because of structural and other deterioration which would require more financing to remedy than would be needed for a new courthouse.

B. The existing needs for court facilities far exceed those that can be accommodated in the existing structure even with extensive renovation.

C. Expansion of the existing structure to accommodate present and projected future needs cannot be accomplished by building an addition to the existing structure.

D. The space and facility needs of the courts in conjunction with the needs of other governmental agencies would be best met by building a new structure.

E. Where court facilities are substantially located in leased spaces and where it would be more cost-effective to house them in a new publicly-owned structure.

F. Where the historic landmark status or the structure prohibits suitable renovations of the existing courthouse.

V.2: Recycling of Existing Structures: New Court facilities may be created by renovating existing structures, such as schools, commercial structures, warehouses or hospitals, as long as the existing structure allows functional layout and design of court facilities with appropriate internal and external symbolism and aesthetic qualities appropriate for a courthouse.

V.3: Long-Term Court Needs: New court facilities should be built to accommodate current and projected needs over the period of the expected life of the new structure. The space and facility needs should be based, wherever possible, on projection of workload, the number of people required to carry out the workload and the space required to house these people.

V.4: Multipurpose Use, Time-Sharing and Flexibility: The translation of projected space and facility needs into a building program should take into account multiple use of facilities, time-sharing of facilities, and inbuilt flexibility of use of spaces.

A. The total number of large courtrooms should be based on the absolute number of full-time, year-round requirements for court parts that have a need for a large public seating capacity (between 100-120).

B. The number of small courtrooms should be based on the total projected needs of all the courts to be housed in the building. No courtroom should be so small that it cannot be converted to properly accommodate a 16-person jury box in its well area.

C. Courtrooms should be so located on the floor as to allow separate prisoner access to all the courtrooms, if so required, in the future.

D. Where judges' chambers are located on the same floor in close proximity to the courtrooms, separate robing and conference rooms adjacent to the courtrooms are not required.

E. The number of jury deliberation rooms to be provided should be based on the current and projected future jury trial rate within the jurisdiction, but that number should not be less than the jury trial rate throughout the State. One jury deliberation room for each courtroom may not be required.

F. The number of attorney/client conference rooms, waiting rooms, and alternate jurors waiting rooms should be based on the principle of shared use of rooms.

G. The prisoner holding facilities adjacent to courtrooms should allow the separation of males and females.

H. Prisoner holding facilities adjacent to courtrooms should provide for at least one secure attorney/defendant interview room.

I. Large multi-courtroom facilities proposed for construction or major renovation should take into account, to the extent feasible, the need for attorneys' waiting rooms, accessible law libraries, public waiting areas, public address systems in public areas, jurors' areas, and designated eating areas for cafeteria facilities.

V.5: Transportation/Accessibility: The courthouse site should be convenient to transportation of the public, attorneys and prisoners.

V.6: Proximity to Court-Related Agencies: The courthouse site should be in close proximity to other related agency locations such as District Attorney's offices, probation offices and County Clerks' offices.

V.7: Separate Building Blocks: Consideration should be given to building two separate blocks - one for courtrooms and ancillary spaces, which require higher ceilings, and the other to accommodate office- type functions with lower ceilings. If appropriately connected to each other, these could lend themselves to the design and installation of cost-effective systems for heating, cooling, security and maintenance, at the same time providing vertical expansion in the future, if required.

V.8: Site Layout, Parking and Landscaping: The site layout should, where feasible, take into account parking needs of court users. Consideration should be given to the security of the parking areas and the separate entrances to the courthouse. The site layout should provide for aesthetically planned, but easy to maintain, grounds and landscape of the surrounding area.

V.9: Character of Building Design and Symbolism: The new courthouse design should project the traditional values of symbolism and retain the character of the area by using appropriate materials and fenestration.

V.10: Placement of Related Functions: Within the building, the functions that require heavy public access, such as clerks' offices and jury assembly area, should be placed on the main and lower floors to minimize the use of elevators, to allow closing off of the upper floors when not in use, and to allow zoning of the heating and cooling systems which can be shut off when the other floors are not in use. By providing clerical space for all courts in the structure on the same or adjacent floors, greater flexibility should be achieved in the allocation of space for clerical functions of different courts. Space can be saved by combining public areas for clerks' offices and photocopying, mail, supplies and general storage areas of all courts. Space can also be saved by allowing flexible use of secondary spaces for record storage by all courts.

V.11: Use of Building Components Offering Flexibility: The design of building components such as nonload-bearing partitions, doors, electrical fixtures, ceiling and floor finishes into integrated systems should allow flexibility in rearranging spaces.

V.12: Choice of Building Materials: Building materials should be chosen for cost-effective maintenance, resistance to vandalism, acoustical qualities and safety.

V.13: Separate Circulation Patterns: The layout should provide for a separate pattern of circulation of judges, jurors, prisoners and the public. Spaces and facilities should be appropriately grouped together as secure, private, semi- private and public areas.

The layout should also be readily understandable to users unfamiliar with the facility. This should minimize the need for signs and avoid intrusion of the public into private areas.

GUIDELINE VI: DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR SECURITY

VI.1: Entrances: The entrances to the structure should be kept to a minimum. Separate entrances may be necessary for the public, judges, staff, prisoners and court-related agencies. However, the entrances for judges and staff can be provided with key or card access to minimize security staffing needs.

VI.2: Visibility: The plan and design should provide public corridors and spaces with uninterrupted visibility.

VI.3: Layout and Design: The layout should be devised so that there are three separate patterns of circulation: the first for judges, impanelled jurors and the court staff; the second for prisoners; and the third for the public. Such circulation should limit the crossing of paths of these separate groups in order to minimize conflicts and to provide a degree of privacy for judges and jurors.

The courthouse design and layout should delineate public, semi-private, private and secure areas. Private areas would include such areas as judges' chambers or robing rooms, impanelled or sequestered jurors' areas, jury deliberation rooms and secure areas. The semi-private areas would include the clerical offices. The public areas would include such areas as courtrooms, jury assembly areas, public lobbies, corridors and public restrooms.

In the Family Court, all areas except the public lobbies, waiting rooms, public restrooms and public areas of the clerk's office should be delineated as private areas to insure confidentiality of proceedings and records.

VI.4: Staircases: Staircases should be so constructed as to prevent unauthorized access to secure areas on other floors.

VI.5: Zoned Areas: The courthouse design and layout should allow for the locking off of entire areas or floors when not in use.

VI.6: Doors and Windows: The design of windows and doors should deter access without compromising aesthetic, natural light and view considerations. The use of better components at somewhat higher initial cost should be considered in order to provide better security than afforded by traditional windows, doors, locks and keys. The use of impact-resistant glass or plastic material should be considered in strategic locations.

VI.7: Lighting and Signs: There should be proper and adequate lighting at strategic locations.

VI.8: Comprehensive Design Approach: When a group of structures is being designed, or a new structure is being added to a group of existing buildings, the layout should consider the security needs of all the structures as a group to eliminate the need for separate security forces and electronic surveillance systems for each structure.

GUIDELINE VII: COURTROOM

VII.1: Courtroom - General: The courtroom is one of the most complex design problems of any courthouse, as well as its focal point. Although there are only four (4) basic types of courtrooms--non- jury, civil, criminal and appellate--a large variety of court-room layouts are used. Hearing rooms are less formal courtrooms.

All public courtrooms should have two major functional areas:

i) The well area should provide for the active participants in the judicial proceeding, and

ii) The public area should provide seating for jurors to be empanelled, attorneys waiting for their cases and the public.

The well area and the public area should be divided by a 3-foot high rail with gates or openings at appropriate places.

The public area should be large enough to accommodate jurors to be empanelled, the attorneys waiting for their cases and the public. In jury trial courtrooms the public seating capacity should not be less than 20.

All courtrooms require a minimum of two and a maximum of four entry/exit points. In a jury courtroom, where possible, an entry/exit point should be provided that allows jurors to avoid mixing with the public. Juries should also be seated at an appropriate distance from the public rail in courtrooms. The judge should have separate direct access to the bench. The public and attorneys should also have an entry/exit point that leads through or by a public seating area. In criminal courtrooms, where possible, a separate entry/exit point should be provided for prisoners away from the bench and the jury box.

Newly constructed or renovated courtrooms in jurisdictions which may wish to hold criminal and civil jury trials in the same courtroom should provide sufficient space in the well area to accommodate a 16-person jury box to handle either criminal or civil cases. (See also guideline V.4 B above.)

Every courtroom should also allow the participants and public to hear all proceedings clearly in normal conversation. Microphones should be used where necessary. (See separate Task Force report on the use of microphones in courtrooms.) The materials used in the courtroom should not produce excessive reverberation or echo. The materials and construction methods used should prevent disruption of court proceedings by outside noise. Where possible, vestibule should be provided at the public entrance to the courtroom or the doors should be soundproof. In existing courtrooms where audibility is poor, microphones should be used. Lighting should be adequate for reading on the work surfaces and for viewing exhibits without producing glare or heat.

The courtroom should have an assigned space for the viewing of exhibits. An exhibit board may be included as an integral part of the courtroom design. If portable stands are to be used, storage space should be provided in an adjacent area, but not necessarily in the courtroom. Coat closets for the public should not be located within the courtroom. Every courtroom should have a working wall clock on the opposite side of the judge's bench.

Where required, adequate electrical outlets and wiring should be provided for the use of audio tapes in evidence, for electronic case processing equipment, for security equipment and for the use of cameras in courtrooms. The basic courtroom design need not be radically changed to accommodate the use of this equipment because the advances in technology are expected to make this equipment unobtrusive.

VII.2: Non-Jury, Public Courtroom (Minimum 600 square feet): The least complicated courtroom type is the non-jury courtroom. Its basic components and requirements are:

-- A minimum well area of 24 feet depth and 20 feet width

-- A judge's bench

. separate exit/entrance
. 8' x 7' minimum work area raised 12" or 18" above floor level
. a shielded working desk 8' x 2'
. ability to hear and see all court participants
. ability to be heard and seen in all parts of the courtroom
. a microphone
. adequate overhead lighting
. if local conditions require, an emergency alarm audible in the court security office

-- A witness stand

. raised 6" or 12" above floor level
. visible to the bench, attorneys and court reporter
. audible throughout the courtroom
. a rail and shelf
. a microphone
. a 3' x 5' minimum area, including circulation space

-- A court reporter station

. adjacent to the witness stand
. ability to observe witness, judge and attorneys
. ability to hear every word spoken on record
. lockable drawer for storage, if required
. lighting similar to judge's
. a 3' x 4' work space

-- A clerk's station

. location next to judge's bench
. shielded working desk
. lockable drawers
. a 5' x 6' area

-- Litigants' tables

. two separate 6' x 3' tables with at least 3 seats for each table so located as to allow private conversations
. easy access to the judge's bench and witness stand
. ability to be heard at bench when speaking conversationally
. lighting similar to judge's bench
. clear view of court proceedings

-- Spectator seating

. separated by rail from well area
. clear view of court proceedings
. 8-12 square feet per person

VII.3: Civil Jury Trial Courtroom (Minimum 1200 square feet): Civil courtrooms have components and requirements similar to those in the non-jury courtrooms, with the need for the following spaces as well:

-- A minimum well area of 24 feet depth and 30 feet width

-- Seven-person jury box, requiring

. seating for six jurors and one alternate in one or two rows, using comfortable arm swivel chairs in 4' x 2' minimum space per juror
. one step between seat rows
. ability to clearly see and hear witnesses, judge and attorneys
. rail and display shelf with adequate lighting
. location of the rail at least three feet from nearest attorney table and the rail separating the spectator area and the public
. a footrest may be included
. exit/entry outside spectator area


VII.4: Criminal Jury Trial Courtroom (Minimum 1600 square feet): Criminal courtrooms use these additional components and requirements in addition to those listed above:

-- Fourteen (instead of seven) person jury box with capacity to add additional jurors

. seating for twelve jurors and two to four alternates in two or three rows, using comfortable arm swivel chairs in 4' x 2' minimum per juror


VII.5: Hearing Rooms: (Minimum 300 square feet): Hearing rooms are less formal courtrooms. They may have a judge's bench and a witness stand. Large hearing rooms for civil proceedings may range in size from 900 to 1200 square feet, depending upon the need for space for attorneys and public waiting for their cases. They may also be used for sentencing in bail or parole cases if secure access to detention areas is available to transport defendents to custody after sentencing.

VII.5a: Hearing Rooms in Family Court (600-900 square feet): Family court hearing rooms should have a minimum of 600 square feet in area. The trend towards increased representation and opening of the proceedings to authorized observers may need an area up to 900 square feet. The hearing rooms should be so constructed as to assure the confidentiality of the proceedings both as to sound and vision. The layout and design should satisfy local procedures and degree of formality. Where feasible, separate access and circulation should be provided for persons in custody.

VII.5b: Hearing Rooms for Other Civil Proceedings (Minimum 300 square feet): These should not be less than 300 square feet in area.

The types of courtrooms used in the New York State court system and their minimum square feet requirements are listed in Table 1 below.

VII.6: Table 1

MINIMUM AREA REQUIREMENTS COURTROOMS

Facility Net Sq. Ft. Minimum Per Unit [FN1]
Court of Claims Courtroom
1,200
Appellate Term Courtroom
1,200
Special Term Courtroom
1,200
Civil Litigation  
Civil Trial Courtroom
(7-person jury box)
1,200
Small Claims Courtroom [FN2]
1,200
Hearing Room (Large)
900
Hearing Room (Medium)
600
Hearing Room (Small)
300
Criminal Litigation  
Felony Trial Courtroom (14-person jury box) [FN3]
1,600
Misdemeanor Trial Courtroom (7-person jury box)
1,200
Arraignment Courtroom and Summons Part Courtroom
1,200
Family Court  
Hearing Room
600 - 900
Surrogate's Court  
Courtroom (7-person jury box)
1,200
City Court  
Courtroom (7-person jury box)
1,200

[FN1] These are recommended minimum net areas. Smaller courtrooms with original or unusual design may be satisfactory and adequate for local needs.
[FN2] Larger courtrooms may be needed where volume of cases and the number of spectators are greater.
[FN3] For 4 alternate jurors, 2 additional chairs could be placed on the side or in front of the jury box.

GUIDELINE VIII: COURTROOM ANCILLARY FACILITIES

VIII.1: Robing Room (Minimum 200 square feet): If the judge's chambers are located away from the courtrooms, robing rooms should be provided adjacent thereto. Direct access from the robing room to the bench in the courtroom should be provided. The robing rooms should have a table and chairs where the judge can hold conference with attorneys and parties. A robing room should also have a restroom or private access to judges' restroom.

VIII.2: Jury Deliberation Rooms: Six-Person Jury Deliberation Room (Minimum 200 square feet); Twelve-Person Deliberation Room (Minimum 325 square feet): The jury deliberation room should be adjacent to courtrooms with access through non-public corridors. It should not be accessible to the public and should be so planned as to allow use of the courtrooms for other matters while the jury is deliberating. It should be so constructed as to ensure confidentiality and should include:

. a coat closet
. a minimum of one restroom
. proper ventilation
. a table large enough to accommodate all jurors
. comfortable chairs
. alarm buzzer to call guard
. privacy should be assured both as to vision and sound

VIII.3: Attorney/Client Conference Room, Witness Waiting Room, Alternate Juror Waiting Room (Minimum 100 square feet - a somewhat large size is recommended to allow flexibility in use): An adequate number of rooms should be provided on each courtroom floor, adjacent to courtrooms and accessible from public waiting areas or from the courtrooms. The rooms should provide convenient access to a telephone. They should be located and furnished to allow them to be also used in other ways.

Note: In larger, high volume courthouses, it may be desirable or feasible to provide for attorneys' waiting rooms, public address systems in public areas, and additional conveniently located telephones. It is also desirable to take into account, to the extent feasible, the particular needs of defense and prosecution attorneys and court related agencies in busy courthouses handling criminal (or juvenile) matters.

VIII.4: Prisoner Holding Facilities Adjacent To Courtroom (Minimum 20 square feet per person, 80 square feet per cell): Courtrooms planned for criminal proceedings should have adjacent prisoner holding facilities planned to allow for separate holding of males and females with adequate privacy. Where feasible, the access to the courtroom should be located away from the bench and the jury box. Access to the central holding area in the courthouse or to the prisoner receiving area of the building should be by secure elevators. Adequate space for the guards should be located so as to allow easy supervision of the prisoners.

Prisoner holding facilities should be provided with a secure alternative means of egress, such as separate staircases, in case of fire. The building materials and methods of construction should comply with appropriate provisions of the New York State Commission of Correction Planning and Design Guidelines for Construction Renovation Programs. Plans for new holding areas are required to be filed with the Commission for approval prior to commencement of construction (Correction Law, section 45[10]).

VIII.5: Secure Attorney/Prisoner Interview Room (Minimum 50 square feet): Prisoner holding facilities next to courtrooms as well as any court supervised central holding facility (if any) in the courthouse should provide secure interview rooms for attorneys to confer with their clients. For busy arraignment courtrooms large holding areas may be necessary and should provide an adequate number of secure interview rooms. The interview rooms should provide for visual surveillance by security personnel and should be so constructed that the conversation between the attorney and his client is private.

VIII.6: Public Waiting Areas Adjacent to Courtroom (Minimum 12 square feet per person): Adequate public waiting areas should be provided adjacent to courtrooms with easy access to public restrooms and telephones. These areas should be easy to maintain and should have such ashtrays and refuse receptacles as are necessary. The courtroom number, name of presiding judge, display of case calendars and emergency exit signs should be clearly visible. Where court procedures prevent wearing of hats and coats in the courtroom, coat racks should be provided.

In Family Courts separate waiting rooms for juveniles and adults are mandatory.

VIII.7: Examination Before Trial Room (Minimum 200 square feet): It is desirable to include an adequate number of Examination Before Trial (EBT) rooms which are accessible from the public area but which can be supervised by the court clerk. These rooms can be used for other purposes when not in use as EBT rooms.

The minimum square foot requirements of courtroom ancillary facilities are listed in Table 2.

VIII.8: Children's Center (Minimum 35 square feet of primary activity space per child exclusive of administrative and ancillary spaces such as staff offices, storage space, bathrooms and hallways, with a minimum total square footage of 150 square feet): A separate, enclosed and safe environment should be provided for children who are in court in connection with matters involving them or their caregivers. The center should be of sufficient size to accommodate a variety of furniture, equipment, toys, books and materials appropriate to the age of the children served, and also should include appropriate storage for such equipment, toys, books and materials, as well as secure storage for children's personal belongings. The center should include toilet facilities and changing tables for children whenever practicable, or such facilities should be otherwise accessible in a nearby restroom.

VIII.9: Table 2

MINIMUM AREA REQUIREMENTS COURTROOM ANCILLARY FACILITIES

Facility Net Sq. Ft. Minimum Per Unit
Robing Room
200
Six-Person Jury Deliberation Room
200
Twelve-Person Jury Deliberation Room
325
Attorney/Client Conference Room, Witness Waiting Room and Alternate Juror Waiting Room Prisoner Holding Facilities Adjacent to Courtrooms 80/Per Cell
100 20/Per Person
Secure Attorney/Prisoner Interview Room
50
Public Waiting Adjacent to Courtroom
12/Per Person
Examination Before Trial Room
200
Children's Center
35 of primary activity space/per child

GUIDELINE IX: JUDGE'S FACILITIES

IX.1: Judge's Chambers: The office occupied by the judge (200 square feet minimum) should be located close to the courtrooms or, in large courthouses, on a separate floor. In either case, judge's chambers should be private with as convenient an access to the courtroom as is reasonably possible.

-- The judge's chambers should have:

. a private office and working area for the judge
. a private restroom or access to a private judges' restroom
. space in the office or in an adjacent conference area
. immediate access to the secretary and any law clerk
. privacy both as to sound and vision

IX.2: Judge's Secretary's Office/Reception (Minimum 200 square feet): Located at the public access to the chambers, this office should provide waiting space for visitors and work/storage space for the judge's secretary.

IX.3: Law Clerk's Office (Minimum 150 square feet): The judge's law clerk should have a private office with work area and shelving for a working law library. The law clerk should have easy access to the judge.

IX.4: Central Reception Area (200-300 square feet): In larger courthouses, if judges' chambers are grouped together on a separate floor or in a separate area, a central reception area should be provided to screen and announce the visitors. Where necessary, security personnel should be present in such an area.

IX.5: Judges' Conference Room (Minimum 20 square feet per person): In larger courthouses, a room may be provided for the judges for conferences and use as a lunchroom. This room should provide a kitchenette and area for a refrigerator and storage.

IX.6: Law Library: In larger courthouses, a central law library should be conveniently located for use by the judges and the legal staff and, where appropriate, for shared use by such attorneys as are active in the courthouse at the time.

IX.7: Judges' Parking: If car parking provisions are possible judges' parking should be so planned as to provide adequate security and direct access to the judges' entrance of the courthouse.

The minimum square foot requirements of judges' facilities are listed in Table 3.

IX.8: Table 3

MINIMUM AREA REQUIREMENTS JUDGE'S FACILITIES

Facility Net Sq. Ft.
Minimum Per Unit
Judge's Office
200
Secretary's Office/Reception
200
Law Clerk's Office
150
Central Reception Area
200-300
Judge's Room
20/Per Person
Law Library
As Required
Judges' Parking
As Required

GUIDELINE X: JUROR FACILITIES

X.1: Jury Assembly (12-20 square feet per person): Courthouses with three (3) or more jury trial courtrooms should include a juror assembly area adequate in size to accommodate the number of jurors required on an average busy day. The assembly area should be comfortably furnished, with separate restrooms and adequate space designed for appropriate orientation. Separation of smokers and nonsmokers may be advisable.

-- The assembly area should:

. be close to the building entrance, but separated from public areas
. have a public counter for identification and processing by court employees
. have adequate means to make announcements in all areas
. be accessible to impanelling rooms
. be accessible to courtrooms without unnecessary exposure to the public

X.2: Jury Impanelling Room - Civil Cases (Minimum 300 square feet for 7-person panel): Jury impanelling rooms should be planned to accommodate up to 20 jurors, attorneys for parties, a table to conduct voir dire, and 7 seats for jurors selected. The impanelling room can double as a waiting room.

X.3: Commissioner of Jurors (Jury Clerk's Office: Depending upon the size of the jury operation, offices are necessary to provide adequate space and offices for the Commissioner of Jurors (or the Jury Clerk) and his staff. The following may be necessary:

. private offices
. shared clerical offices
. interview booths for juror qualification
. space for juror call-in equipment
. records storage space
. mail, copying and supply storage

These offices should be planned as close to the juror assembly areas as possible to allow better utilization of staff resources.

The minimum square foot requirements of juror facilities are listed in Table 4.

X.4 Table 4

MINIMUM AREA REQUIREMENTS JUROR FACILITIES

Facility Net Sq. Ft. Minimum
Per Unit
Assembly
12-20/Per Person
Impanelling Room
300
Commissioner of Jurors
Office As Required

GUIDELINE XI: CLERICAL FACILITIES

XI.1: Clerk's Office: The clerk's office is generally the most visible and heavily used part of the courthouse. It is responsible for processing all documents, keeping records, and answering questions from the public. The clerks' offices should be located near the main entrance of the building but should, to the extent possible, have private access to judges' chambers and the courtrooms.

The clerk's office should include:

-- A public area for waiting/reception (20 square feet per person - minimum 100 square feet)

. a public counter
. a cashier's station with adequate security
. a table for public use
. seats for waiting
. copying machine (coin operated) for public use
. display boards
. public records access area

-- General office area behind counter with no public access

. working desks - 85-95 square feet per employee
. record files for current work
. electronic data processing equipment, if necessary

-- Private areas

. offices for chief clerk and assistants
. conference room (20 square feet/person)
. microfilm room, if necessary
. records storage area
. mail, supply, photocopying and general supplies areas
. vault or safe for storage of cash, important records or evidence

-- Staff facilities as required by law

Table 5 shows the minimum square foot requirements of clerks' offices by title and type of office.

XI.2: Table 5

MINIMUM AREA REQUIREMENTS CLERICAL FACILITIES

Facility Type of Office Net Sq. Ft. Minimum Per Unit
Chief Clerk Private 200
Assistants   As Required
Public Space and Counter   20 sq. ft. per person minimum 100
General Office Area   85-95 sq. ft. per person
Records Storage Vault As Required
Microfilm Room Storage As Required
Supplies General Storage As Required
Reproduction and Mail Room   As Required
Male/Female Restrooms   As Required by law
Sick Room for Women   As Required by law
Lounge/Lunch Room   As Required

GUIDELINE XII: SUPPORT STAFF FACILITIES

XII.1: General: Office-type space should be provided for law assistants, law stenographers, court reporters, transcribers and interpreters. In large courthouses a number of personnel of the same title performing similar functions may be housed in one area close to other related functions for ease of supervision and assignments and to provide the required degree of privacy or public accessibility to the group as a whole.

XII.2: Law, Assistant's Office (Minimum 150 square feet per office): Private offices should be provided close to the law library and to the judge's chambers. Law assistants perform legal research on pending cases and, therefore, the location of their offices should provide adequate confidentiality.

XII.3: Law Stenographer's Office (Minimum 80 square feet per person): Law Stenographers type legal memoranda prepared by law assistants on pending cases as well as decisions and rulings rendered by judges in cases before them. Location of their offices should not allow public access. A pool of law stenographers should be housed in a shared space with access to photocopy equipment and lockable short-time storage equipment. A private office for the supervisor may be necessary.

XII.4: Court Reporter's Office (Minimum 100 square feet per office): Court reporters should have the use of offices in which to transcribe testimony.

In locations where electronic recording equipment is used, secure storage space for equipment, and tapes and space for transcribers should be provided.

XII.5: Transcriber's Office (Minimum 60 square feet per person): Semi-private offices usng sound- absorbent cubicles or shared offices should be provided to transcribers close to the court reporters' offices and tape/equipment storage room. Soundproofing may be necessary.

XII.6: Interpreter's Office (Minimum 60 square feet per person): Should the court employ full-time interpreters they should be provided with a designated waiting station.

The minimum area requirements for support staff facilities are listed in Table 6.

XII.7: Table 6

MINIMUM AREA REQUIREMENTS SUPPORT STAFF FACILITIES

Facility Type of office Net Sq. Ft. Minimum Per Unit
Law Assistant's Office
Private
150
Law Stenographer's Office
Shared
80
Court Report's Office
Shared
100
Transcriber's Office Shared
Shared
60
Interpreter's Station
Shared
As Required

GUIDELINE XIII: SECURITY PERSONNEL FACILITIES

XIII.1: Security Station with First-Aid Facilities(Minimum 160 square feet): Security stations should be located at strategic locations in the courthouse to complement the courthouse security system composed of electronic equipment, if any, and the security personnel. A security station at the main entrance should allow screening of the persons entering the courthouse. A security control station should also be established as a communication center to act in emergencies. The office of the person in charge of security may act as the control station or the command station.

XIII.2: Security Chief's Office (Minimum 120 square feet): The person in charge of security should have a private office which acts as a communications center and a command/control station. Any audio/visual security system should be connected to this station and should be able to be activated from this station in case of emergencies. The security personnel may be required to report here for duty. This office should have a safe for deposit of firearms or confiscated weapons.

XIII.3: Security Personnel Lockers (12 square feet per person): Where a courthouse utilizes uniformed security personnel, secure separate locker spaces should be provided. This facility can be located in secondary spaces (basement or windowless spaces) in the building.

The minimum area requirement of security personnel facilities are listed in Table 7.

XIII.4: Table 7

MINIMUM AREA REQUIREMENTS SECURITY PERSONNEL FACILITIES

Facility Type of office Net Sq. Ft. Minimum Per Unit
Security Station with first-aid  
160 facilities
Security Chief's Office
Private
120
Uniformed Security Personnel Lockers
Secondary Space
12/Per Locker

GUIDELINE XIV: FACILITIES FOR THE PUBLIC

XIV.1: Public Waiting and Information Spaces: The main entrance lobby and areas outside the courtrooms should be adequate for public waiting. These spaces should also prominently display courthouse directory, directional signs, and court calendars. Adequate public pay telephones should be placed in this area. Access doors to private areas should be clearly marked as private. Unmarked doors and panels should be kept locked. Drinking water fountains should be located in these areas.

XIV.2: Public Restrooms Male/Female (As per building code): Restrooms for public use should be located close to public waiting areas and clearly marked.

XIV.3: Press Room (120 square feet): A room may be set aside for use by media representatives when assigned to the courthouse. Public pay telephones should be located in or close to this room.

XIV.4: Table 8

MINIMUM AREA REQUIREMENTS FACILITIES FOR THE PUBLIC

Facility Net Sq. Ft. Minimum Per Unit
Public Waiting
12/Per Person
Information Booth
As Required
Male/Female Restrooms
As Per Building Code
Press Room
120

XIV.5: Eating Facilities: Where other alternatives are not readily accessible, consideration should be given to providing eating facilities for court employees, attorneys, jury members or the public.

[FNa1] Detailed technical criteria may be obtained from the New York State Office of Court Administration.

Historical Note
Sec. filed July 19, 1983; amd. filed July 18, 1994 eff. June 30, 1994.

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  Section 34.1 Maintenance and operation standards for court facilities.

(a) The Chief Administrator of the Courts shall require from each political subdivision seeking reimbursement of (1) maintenance and operations costs pursuant to section 54-j(2) of the State Finance Law or (2) workfare administration and supervision expenses pursuant to section 52-j(2-a) of such law a certification that such political subdivision is in compliance with the maintenance and operation standards set forth below. Failure to comply with such standards may result in the loss of reimbursement for maintenance and operation costs. The Chief Administrator also shall require from each political subdivision seeking reimbursement of workfare administration and supervision expenses (1) a certification that it has complied with the provisions of section 54-j(2-a)(d) of the State Finance Law and (2) itemizations of its workfare administration and supervision expenses for the 12-month period concluding September 30, 1994, and for the period for which reimbursement is sought.

(b) A political subdivision may request exemption from one or more of the cleaning frequency schedules or maintenance routines of the maintenance and operation standards. Such request shall be made in writing to the Chief Administrator and may be granted for good cause shown. Exemptions shall be granted for a period of up to two years and may be renewed, upon written request, in the discretion of the Chief Administrator.

(c) Definitions. For the purpose of this Part, the terms below have the following meanings:

(1) Operation consists of those day-to-day services and activities which are necessary to keep the physical plant open and in a usable condition.

(2) Maintenance includes those services, activities and procedures which are concerned with preserving, protecting and keeping buildings, grounds and equipment in a satisfactory state of repair. Included in these activities are some repairs, replacements, renovations and adjustments. Existing court facilities and those which are currently being constructed will require adequate maintenance if they are to function satisfactorily.

(3) Preventive maintenance is a planned schedule for accomplishing required maintenance operations as categorized by the following needs:

(4) Recurring - tasks and jobs which should be performed one or more times each year and should be on a scheduled basis, e.g., floor and furniture care, some types of lawn and grounds maintenance and specialized care of mechanical and heating equipment.

(5) Periodic - tasks and jobs which may need attention less frequently than recurring maintenance. Generally they include repair and renovation items which follow cycles of from three to five years, such as roof repair; repair of window shades, blinds and drapes; weather proofing windows, doors and walls and repairing heating plants.

(6) Replacement - occurs when circumstances create a need for certain types of maintenance at inopportune times, i.e.plumbing leaks.

(7) Repair - improvement tasks that restore broken items by replacing parts or by mending.

(8) Leased space - space which is rented in a privately owned building for use by the court or a court agency.

(9) Utilities - services such as water, sewer, gas and electricity which are required to operate a building.

(10) Hard and resilient flooring - all hard flooring such as concrete, ceramic, terrazzo, brick and marble requires stripping and sealing. All resilient flooring such as vinyl asbestos tile, linoleum, etc., requires several coats of floor finish.

(11) High cleaning - space throughout the facility 70 inches or more from the floor. Includes but is not limited to walls, ceiling area adjacent to ventilating and air conditioning outlets, transoms, clocks, moldings around ceilings, tops of partitions, overhead pipes, pictures, plaques, wall or ceiling diffusers, file cases, bookcases, lockers, etc.

(12) Landscape and grounds maintenance - includes: mowing lawns, power raking, trimming of and around trees, shrubs, fences, monuments, flag poles, walls, etc., fertilizing, mulching, watering, raking leaves, weed, pest and disease control.

(13) Pest control - is defined as those measures which are necessary to suppress the population of arachnids, crawling and flying insects, rats, mice and/or any other species which become a pest within or around the facilities covered by this solicitation/contract.

(14) Facilities management - the total operational responsibility for a facility or group of facilities that includes but is not limited to: maintenance and operations of systems, cleaning, landscape maintenance, trash/debris removal, pest control, and structural and maintenance repairs.

(15) Workfare administration and supervision expenses include (i) the salary and fringe benefit costs to a political subdivision for each person it employs whose duties constitute the supervision of persons who clean and maintain court facilities pursuant to a workfare program provided through the Department of Social Services; and (ii) any other reasonable and necessary administrative costs for the implementation of such a workfare program that may be incurred by a bureau, division or department of a political subdivision that is directly responsible for the maintenance and operation of court facilities.

(d) Section I Operation Standards--Cleaning Tasks and Frequency Schedules.

The abbreviations for the frequency standards are:

D = daily
D/2 = twice daily
W = weekly
M/2 = twice monthly
M = monthly
Q = quarterly
S/A = semi-annually
A = annually
A/R = as required/requested

1. Grounds and building entries.


FREQUENCY SCHEDULE
 
D/2
D
W
M/2
M
Q
S/A
A
A/R
Police Areas (B)
X








Clean Lobby Entry Glass


X






Clean Bright Work Metal





X



Sweep Outside Entryways
X









Sweep Steps
X








Sweep Landings
X








Empty Litter Containers
X








Check/Clean Catchbasins & Drains

X







Check/Replace Burned Out Lights

X







Check/Replace Missing Signage

X







Check/Report on Inset/Rodent Control

X







Check/Report Erosion


X






Check/Report Quailty of Maintenance in Landscaped Areas


X






Check/Report Deteriorated Surfaces


X






Maintain Snow-Free Walks/Entryways








X
Maintain Clear Passage for Public








X
Maintain Clear Passage for Prisoners








X
Hose & Scrub Down Exterior Entry Areas




X




Report Any DAmage or Hazards

X







*Painting








X
**Graffiti








X
Turn Off Lights When Appropriate

(A) Clean and Rectify Problem
(B) Free of discarded materials and trash

* Painting - Touch Up As Required; Cycle Painting ANNUALLY, e.g. Benches, Metal Doors, Frames, Traffic Markings, Etcetera
**Graffiti - To Be Removed Without Delay

2. Main/entrance/lobbies.

Public Waiting Area(s)
Alcoves - Candy Stand
Telephone Area
Elevator Lobbies


FREQUENCY SCHEDULE
 
D/2
D
W
M/2
M
Q
S/A
A
A/R
Unlock and Lock Areas  
X







Check & Close Windows

X







Check & Replace Missing Sinage

X



 



Check & Replace Burned Out Lights  
X








Remove Cobwebs  

X






Police Area (B)
X








Empty & Clean Waste Containers
X








Empty & Clean Ash Receivers
X








*Dust High Ceiling & Walls






X


*Dust Light Fixtures






X


*Dust Walls & Decorations






X


*Dust/Clean & Arrange Furniture






X


*Dust Window Sills, Doors & Frames


X






*Dust & Adjust Window Blinds/Shades


X






*Dust Radiators & Covers


X






*Dust Mop/Sweep Floors

X







Clean Floors & Remove Stains

X







Spray Buff Floors (1)


X






Strip & Refinish Floors







X

Spot Clean Walls & Partitions


X






Spot Clean Glass, Doors & Frames


X






Clean/Polish Metal (Brass, etc.)        
X
       
Clean/Polish & Arrange Furniture            
X
   
Clean & Sanitize Drinking Fountains
X
               
Clean Door Saddles    
X
           
Clean Floor Mats/Runners  
X
             
Repair/Replace Flooring                
X
Wash/Clean & Adjust Blinds/Shades              
X
 
Wash Walls & Partitions              
X
 
Wash Glass, Doors & Frames            
X
   
Wash Windows, Exterior/Interior            
X
   
Disassemble, Clean & Reassemble Light Fixtures              
X
 
Report Any Damage or Hazards (A)  
X
             
**Painting                
X
***Graffiti                
X
Turn Off Lights When Appropriate

(A) Clean and Rectify Problem
(B) Free of discarded materials and trash

(1) Includes: Sweep, Damp Mop, Spray Buff and Dry Mop
*Dust - Utilize Treated Cloths/Mops
**Painting - Touch Up As Required; Cycle Painting within THREE YEARS
***Graffiti - To Be Removed Without Delay

3. Circulation Public Space

Hallways - Passageways
Corridors - Vestibules
Alcove - Lobbies


FREQUENCY SCHEDULE
 
D/2
D
W
M/2
M
Q
S/A
A
A/R
Check & Close Windows

X







Check & Replace Missing Sinage

X



 



Check & Replace Burned Out Lights  
X








Remove Cobwebs  

X






Police Area(s)(B)
X








Empty & Clean Waste Containers
X








Empty & Clean Ash Receivers
X








*Dust High Ceiling & Walls






X


*Dust Light Fixtures






X


*Dust Walls, Decorations & Cabinets






X


*Dust/Clean & Arrange Furniture






X


*Dust Window Sills, Doors & Frames


X






*Dust & Adjust Window Blinds/Shades


X






*Dust Radiators & Covers


X






*Dust Mop/Sweep Floors

X







Clean Floors & Remove Stains

X







Spray Buff Floors (1)


X






Strip & Refinish Floors







X

Spot Clean Walls & Partitions


X






Spot Clean Glass, Doors & Frames


X






Clean/Polish Metal (Brass, etc.)  
X
             
Clean/Polish & Arrange Furniture        
X
       
Clean/Sanitize Drinking Fountains  
X
             
Clean Door Saddles    
X
           
Clean Floor Mats/Runners  
X
             
Repair/Replace Flooring                
X
Wash/Clean & Adjust Blinds/Shades              
X
 
Wash Walls & Partitions              
X
 
Wash Glass, Doors & Frames            
X
   
Wash Windows, Exterior/Interior            
X
   
Disassemble, Clean & Reassemble Light Fixtures              
X
 
Report Any Damage or Hazards (A)  
X
             
**Painting                
X
***Graffiti                
X
Turn Off Lights When Appropriate

(A) Clean and Rectify Problem
(B) Free of discarded materials and trash

(1) Includes: Sweep, Damp Mop, Spray Buff and Dry Mop
*Dust - Utilize Treated Cloths/Mops
**Painting - Touch Up As Required; Cycle Painting Three To Five Years
***Graffiti - To Be Removed Without Delay

4. Stairs and landings.


FREQUENCY SCHEDULE
 
D/2
D
W
M/2
M
Q
S/A
A
A/R
Check & Close Windows

X







Check & Report Inoperative Hardware  
X
             
Check & Replace Burned Out Lights  
X
             
Check & Report Inoperative Doors

X



 



Check & Replace Missing Sinage  
X








Police Area (B)

X







*Dust Window, frames & Doors      
X



   
*Dust Doors, Frames & Handrails      
X
         
*Dust Fire Apparatus & Vents



X





*Dust Light Fixtures






X


Sweep Landings, Steps & Risers


X






Damp Wipe Surfaces to Door Height





X



Wash Windows Exterior/Interior






X


Mop Landings, Steps & Risers


X






Wash & Dry All Metal Surfaces






X


Report Missing/Broken Fire Apparatus  
X
           

Report Any Damage or Hazards (A)  
X
             
**Painting                
X
***Graffiti                
X

(A) Clean and Rectify Problem
(B) Free of discarded materials and trash

(1) Includes: Sweep, Damp Mop, Spray Buff and Dry Mop
*Dust - Utilize Treated Cloths/Mops
**Painting - Touch Up As Required; Cycle Painting FIVE TO SEVEN YEARS Except WHere Stairways Are Used For General Circulatin.
***Graffiti - To Be Removed Without Delay

5. Elevators/escalators (1).


FREQUENCY SCHEDULE
 
D/2
D
W
M/2
M
Q
S/A
A
A/R
Check & Replace Missing Sinage

X







Check & Replace Burned Out Lights  
X
             
Check Current Certificate Operation                
X
Check Controls Access Door  
X
           

Check Indicator Lamps

X



 



Check & Report Any Malfunction  
X







Check Emergency Stop & Alarm Operation


X






Police Elevator Cab & Area (B)    

 

       
*Dust Light Fixtures      

X


   
*Dust Ventilation Ducts/Fan Grills      

X
       
*Dust Elevator Cab & Doors

X







*Dust Mop Floor

X







*Spot Cleam Elevator Cab & Doors

X







Clean Floor

X







Clean, Wax, Polish Panels & Walls




X

 


Clean Door Tracks

X







Wipe, Clean Elevator Hatch Doors                
X
Buff Finish Floor


X






Vacuum/Carpet and Spot Clean  
X
           

Shampoo Carpet

             
X
Report Any Damage or Hazards (A)
X
               
**Painting                
X
***Graffiti                
X

(A) Clean and Rectify Problem
(B) Free of discarded materials and trash

(1) Clean Exposed Surfaces of Treads, Risers and Landings. Polish Bright Metal Surfaces Daily
*Dust - Utilize Treated Cloths/Mops
**Painting - Hatchway Doors As Required; Cycle Painting Three To Five Years
***Graffiti - To Be Removed Without Delay

6. Public toilets.

Jury Assembly Room Toilets
Jurors/Public
Toilets - Washrooms
Lavatories - Powder Rooms


FREQUENCY SCHEDULE
 
D/2
D
W
M/2
M
Q
S/A
A
A/R
Lock/Unlock Area

X







Check & Close Windows  
X
             
Check & Replace Missing Signage  
X
             
Check & Replace Burned Out Lights  
X
           

Remove Cobwebs




X
 



Police Area (B)
X








Empty Waste Containers
X
               
*Dust Spot Clean Ceilings




X




Clean Walls and Disinfect  

X
 

       
Clean Floors  
X
 




   
Clean Mirros  
X
             
Clean Sinks, Urinals & Water Closets  
X
 


       
Clean Tile Walls


X






Clean Toilet Stalls/Partitions


X






Clean & Shine Chrome

X







Clean Light Fixtures




X




Clean Exhaust Vents




X

 


Clean Painted Doors & Frames

X
X






Resupply Paper, Soap & Hygiene Products
X
             

Wash Windows Exterior/Interior






X


Disassemble, Clean & Reassemble Light Fixtures


         
X

Report Any Damage or Hazards (A)
X
               
**Painting                
X
***Graffiti                
X

REPORT DRIPPING/RUNNING WATER

(A) Clean and Rectify Problem
(B) Free of discarded materials and trash

*Dust - Utilize Treated Cloths/Mops
** Painting - Touch Up As Required; Cycle Painting ANNUALLY
***Graffiti - To Be Removed Without Delay

7. Employee toilets.

Toilets - Washrooms
Lavatories - Powder Rooms


FREQUENCY SCHEDULE
 
D/2
D
W
M/2
M
Q
S/A
A
A/R
Lock/Unlock Area

X







Check & Close Windows  
X
             
Check & Replace Missing Signage  
X
             
Check & Replace Burned Out Lights  
X
           

Remove Cobwebs




X
 



Police Area (B)
X
X







Empty Waste Containers
X
               
*Dust Spot Clean Ceilings




X




Clean Walls and Disinfect  

X
 

       
Clean Floors  
X
 




   
Clean Mirros  
X
             
Clean Sinks, Urinals & Water Closets  
X
 


       
Clean Tile Walls


X






Clean Toilet Stalls/Partitions


X






Clean & Shine Chrome

X







Clean Light Fixtures




X




Clean Exhaust Vents




X

 


Clean Painted Doors & Frames


X






Resupply Paper, Soap & Hygiene Products
X
             

Wash Windows Exterior/Interior






X


Disassemble, Clean & Reassemble Light Fixtures


         
X

Report Any Damage or Hazards (A)
X
               
**Painting                
X
***Graffiti                
X

REPORT DRIPPING/RUNNING WATER

(A) Clean and Rectify Problem
(B) Free of discarded materials and trash

*Dust - Utilize Treated Cloths/Mops
** Painting - Touch Up As Required; Cycle Painting within Three Years
***Graffiti - To Be Removed Without Delay

8. Private toilets.

Jury Diliberation Room Toilet
Judges - Washrooms
Lavatories - Powder Rooms


FREQUENCY SCHEDULE
 
D/2
D
W
M/2
M
Q
S/A
A
A/R
Lock/Unlock Area

X







Check & Close Windows  
X
             
Check & Replace Missing Signage  
X
             
Check & Replace Burned Out Lights  
X
           

Police Area (B)

X







Empty Waste Containers  
X
             
*Dust Spot Clean Ceilings




X




Clean Walls and Disinfect  

X
 

       
Clean Floors  
X
 




   
Clean Sink & Fixtures  
X
             
Clean Mirrors  
X
             
Clean Tile Walls


X






Clean & Shine Chrome

X







Clean Light Fixtures




X




Clean Exhaust Vents




X

 


Resupply Paper, Soap & Hygiene Products  
X
           

Wash Windows Exterior/Interior






X


Disassemble, Clean & Reassemble Light Fixtures


         
X

Report Any Damage or Hazards (A)

X
             
**Painting                
X
***Graffiti                
X

REPORT DRIPPING/RUNNING WATER

(A) Clean and Rectify Problem
(B) Free of discarded materials and trash

*Dust - Utilize Treated Cloths/Mops
** Painting - Touch Up As Required; Cycle Painting Within THREE YEARS
***Graffiti - To Be Removed Without Delay

9. Office I.

Interpreters,
Clerks, Transcribers,
Court Reporters, Security
Office, File/Storage


FREQUENCY SCHEDULE
 
D/2
D
W
M/2
M
Q
S/A
A
A/R
Lock/Unlock Area

X







Check & Close Windows  
X
             
Check & Replace Missing Signage  
X
             
Check & Replace Burned Out Lights  
X
           

Remove Cobwebs




X
 



Empty & Clean Waste Containers  
X
             
Empty & Clean Ash Receivers  
X
             
*Dust High Ceiling and Walls






X


*Dust Light Fixtures  


 

 
X
   
*Dust Walls, Decorations & Cabinets      


X

   
*Dust/Clean & Arrange Furniture            
X
   
*Dust Window Sills, Doors & Frames    
X


       
*Dust & Adjust Window Blinds/Shades


X






*Dust Radiators & Covers


X






*Dust Mop/Sweep Floors

X







Spray Buff Floors (1)




X




Strip & Refinish Floors






X


Spot Clean Walls & Partitions        
X
     

Spot Clean Glass, Doors & Frames    
X
           
Clean/Polish & Arrange Furniture






X


Clean Door Saddles


X
         

Repair/Replace Flooring

             
X
Wash/Clean & Adjust Blinds/Shades              
X
 
Wash Walls & Partitions              
X
 
Wash Glass, Doors & Frames            
X
   
Wash Windows, Exterior/Interior            
X
   
Disassemble, Clean & Reassemble Light Fixtures              
X
 
Report Any Damage or Hazards (A)  
X
             
**Painting                
X
***Graffiti                
X

Turn Off Lights When Appropriate

(1) Includes: Sweep, Damp Mop, Spray Buff and Dry Mop

(A) Clean and Rectify Problem

*Dust - Utilize Treated Cloths/Mops
** Painting - Touch Up As Required; Cycle Painting THREE/FIVE YEARS
***Graffiti - To Be Removed Without Delay

10. Office II.

Court Clerks,
Examination Before Trial,
Law Assistants, Law Stenographers


FREQUENCY SCHEDULE
 
D/2
D
W
M/2
M
Q
S/A
A
A/R
Lock/Unlock Area

X







Check & Close Windows  
X
             
Check & Replace Missing Signage  
X
             
Check & Replace Burned Out Lights  
X
           

Remove Cobwebs




X
 



Empty & Clean Waste Containers  
X
             
Empty & Clean Ash Receivers  
X
             
*Dust High Ceiling and Walls






X


*Dust Light Fixtures  


 

 
X
   
*Dust Walls, Decorations & Cabinets          
X
     
*Dust/Clean & Arrange Furniture  

     

X
   
*Dust Window Sills, Doors & Frames  
X



       
*Dust & Adjust Window Blinds/Shades

X







*Dust Radiators & Covers

X







*Dust Shelving & Books

X







*Dust Woodwork & Panels  
X
             
Spot Clean Walls & Partitions    

X

     

Spot Clean Glass, Doors & Frames  
X

           
Spot Clean Upholstered Furniture                
X
Spot Clean Rugs/Carpets                
X
Clean/Polish & Arrange Furniture






X


Clean/Polish Woodwork & Panels              
X
 
Clean Door Saddles


X
         

Vacuum Carpet/Rugs    
X
     

   
Vacuum Upholstered Furniture            
X
   
Vacuum Drapes            
X

 
Shampoo Carpet/Rugs              
X

Restretch Carpet                
X
Repair/Replace Carpet              

X
Wash/Clean & Adjust Blinds/Shades              
X
 
Wash Walls & Partitions              
X
 
Wash Glass, Doors & Frames            
X
   
Wash Windows, Exterior/Interior            
X
   
Disassemble, Clean & Reassemble Light Fixtures              
X
 
Report Any Damage or Hazards (A)  
X
             
**Painting                
X
***Graffiti                
X

Turn Off Lights When Appropriate

(A) Clean and Rectify Problem

*Dust - Utilize Treated Cloths/Mops
** Painting - Touch Up As Required; Cycle Painting THREE/FIVE YEARS
***Graffiti - To Be Removed Without Delay

11. Juror Facilities.

Jury Clerk's Office
Jury Assembly/Waiting Room
Impanelling Rooms
Deliberation Room


FREQUENCY SCHEDULE
 
D/2
D
W
M/2
M
Q
S/A
A
A/R
Lock/Unlock Area

X







Check & Close Windows  
X
             
Check & Replace Missing Signage  
X
             
Check & Replace Burned Out Lights  
X
           

Remove Cobwebs




X
 



Police Area (B)  
X
             
Empty & Clean Waste Containers  
X
             
Empty & Clean Ash Receivers  
X
             
*Dust High Ceiling and Walls






X


*Dust Light Fixtures  


 

 
X
   
*Dust/Clean & Arrange Furniture  
X
             
*Dust Window Sills, Doors & Frames  
X



       
*Dust & Adjust Window Blinds/Shades

X







*Dust Radiators & Covers

X







*Dust Mop/Sweep Floors

X







Spray Buff Floors (1)


X






Strip & Refinish Floors






X


Spot Clean Walls & Partitions    
X
 

     

Spot Clean Glass, Doors & Frames    
X
           
Clean/Polish & Arrange Furniture






X


Clean & Disinfect Drinking Fountains  
X
             
Clean Door Saddles


X
         

Repair/Replace Flooring

             
X
Wash/Clean & Adjust Blinds/Shades              
X
 
Wash Walls & Partitions              
X
 
Wash Glass, Doors & Frames            
X
   
Wash Windows, Exterior/Interior            
X
   
Disassemble, Clean & Reassemble Light Fixtures              
X
 
Report Any Damage or Hazards (A)  
X
             
**Painting                
X
***Graffiti                
X

Turn Off Lights When Appropriate

(A) Clean and Rectify Problem
(B) Free of discarded materials and trash
(1) Includes: Sweep, Damp Mop, Spray Buff and Dry Mop

*Dust - Utilize Treated Cloths/Mops
** Painting - Touch Up As Required; Cycle Painting Within Three Years
***Graffiti - To Be Removed Without Delay

12. Court room areas.

Court Room
Witness Waiting Room
Robing Room
Attorney Conference Room
Conference/Board Room
Lounge/Lunch Room


FREQUENCY SCHEDULE
 
D/2
D
W
M/2
M
Q
S/A
A
A/R
Lock/Unlock Area

X







Check & Close Windows  
X
             
Check & Replace Missing Signage  
X
             
Check & Replace Burned Out Lights  
X
           

Check Court Room Clock for Accuracy  
X
             
Remove Cobwebs




X
 



Police Area (B)  
X
             
Empty & Clean Waste Containers  
X
             
*Dust High Ceiling and Walls






X


*Dust Light Fixtures  


 

 
X
   
*Dust/Clean & Arrange Furniture  
X
             
*Dust Window Sills, Doors & Frames  

X


       
*Dust & Adjust Window Blinds/Shades


X






*Dust Radiators & Covers


X






*Dust Mop/Sweep Floors

X







*Dust Woodwork & Panels    
X
           
Spray Buff Floors (1)


X






Strip & Refinish Floors






X


Spot Clean Walls    
X
 

     

Clean/Polish & Arrange Furniture






X


Clean/Polish Woodwork & Panels              
X
 
Repair/Replace Flooring

             
X
Wash/Clean & Adjust Blinds/Shades              
X
 
Wash Walls              
X
 
Wash Glass, Doors & Frames            
X
   
Wash Windows, Exterior/Interior            
X
   
Disassemble, Clean & Reassemble Light Fixtures              
X
 
Report Any Damage or Hazards (A)  
X
             
**Painting                
X
***Graffiti                
X

Turn Off Lights When Appropriate

(A) Clean and Rectify Problem
(B) Free of discarded materials and trash
(1) Includes: Sweep, Damp Mop, Spray Buff and Dry Mop

*Dust - Utilize Treated Cloths/Mops
** Painting - Touch Up As Required; Cycle Painting Within Three Years
***Graffiti - To Be Removed Without Delay

13. Judges facilities.

Chambers
Secretary's Office
Law Clerk's Office
Reception/Waiting Room


FREQUENCY SCHEDULE
 
D/2
D
W
M/2
M
Q
S/A
A
A/R
Lock/Unlock Area

X







Check & Close Windows  
X
             
Check & Replace Missing Signage  
X
             
Check & Replace Burned Out Lights  
X
           

Remove Cobwebs




X
 



Empty & Clean Waste Containers  
X
             
Empty & Clean Ash Receivers  
X
             
*Dust High Ceiling and Walls






X


*Dust Light Fixtures  


 

 
X
   
*Dust Walls, Decorations & Cabinets          
X
     
*Dust/Clean & Arrange Furniture  

     
X

   
*Dust Window Sills, Doors & Frames  
X



       
*Dust & Adjust Window Blinds/Shades

X







*Dust Radiators & Covers

X







*Dust Shelving & Books

X







*Dust Woodwork & Panels  
X
             
Spot Clean Walls & Partitions    

X

     

Spot Clean Glass, Doors & Frames  
X

           
Spot Clean Upholstered Furniture                
X
Spot Clean Rugs/Carpets                
X
Clean/Polish & Arrange Furniture






X


Clean/Polish Woodwork & Panels              
X
 
Vacuum Carpet/Rugs  
X

     

   
Vacuum Upholstered Furniture            
X
   
Vacuum Drapes            
X

 
Shampoo Carpet/Rugs              
X

Restretch Carpet                
X
Repair/Replace Carpet              

X
Wash/Clean & Adjust Blinds/Shades              
X
 
Wash Walls & Partitions              

X
Wash Glass, Doors & Frames            
X
   
Wash Windows, Exterior/Interior            
X
   
Disassemble, Clean & Reassemble Light Fixtures              
X
 
Report Any Damage or Hazards (A)  
X
             
**Painting                
X
***Graffiti                
X

Turn Off Lights When Appropriate

(A) Clean and Rectify Problem

*Dust - Utilize Treated Cloths/Mops
** Painting - Touch Up As Required; Cycle Painting Within THREE/FIVE YEARS
***Graffiti - To Be Removed Without Delay

14. Library facilities.

Librarian's Office
Library/Reading Rooms
Storage


FREQUENCY SCHEDULE
 
D/2
D
W
M/2
M
Q
S/A
A
A/R
Lock/Unlock Area

X







Check & Close Windows  
X
             
Check & Replace Missing Signage  
X
             
Check & Replace Burned Out Lights  
X
           

Remove Cobwebs




X
 



Police Area (B)  
X
             
Empty & Clean Waste Containers  
X
             
Empty & Clean Ash Receivers  
X
             
*Dust High Ceiling and Walls






X


*Dust Light Fixtures  


 

 
X
   
*Dust Walls, Decorations & Cabinets          
X
     
*Dust/Clean & Arrange Furniture  

     
X

   
*Dust Window Sills, Doors & Frames  
X


       
*Dust & Adjust Window Blinds/Shades


X






*Dust Radiators & Covers    
X
           
*Dust Mop/Sweep Floors  
X
             
*Dust Shelving & Books



X





*Dust Woodwork & Panels  

X
           
Spray Buff Floors (1)  

X
           
Strip & Refinish Floors              
X

Spot Clean Walls & Partitions        
X
     

Spot Clean Glass, Doors & Frames    
X
           
Clean/Polish & Arrange Furniture






X


Clean/Polish Woodwork & Panels            
X

 
Repair/Replace Flooring              

X
Wash/Clean & Adjust Blinds/Shades              
X
 
Wash Walls & Partitions              
X

Wash Glass, Doors & Frames            
X
   
Wash Windows, Exterior/Interior            
X
   
Disassemble, Clean & Reassemble Light Fixtures              
X
 
Report Any Damage or Hazards (A)  
X
             
**Painting                
X
***Graffiti                
X

Turn Off Lights When Appropriate

(A) Clean and Rectify Problem
(B) Free of discarded materials and trash

(1) Includes: Sweep, Damp Mop, Spray Buff and Dry Mop

*Dust - Utilize Treated Cloths/Mops
** Painting - Touch Up As Required; Cycle Painting Within FIVE YEARS
***Graffiti - To Be Removed Without Delay

15. Security facilities I.

Information Stations
Magnatometer Entries


FREQUENCY SCHEDULE
 
D/2
D
W
M/2
M
Q
S/A
A
A/R
Police Area (B)

X







Empty & Clean Waste Containers
X

             
Empty & Clean Ash Receivers
X

             
*Dust/Clean & Arrange Furniture  
X
     


   
Clean/Polish & Arrange Furniture






X


Report Any Damage or Hazards (A)  
X
             
**Painting                
X
***Graffiti                
X

Turn Off Lights When Appropriate

(A) Clean and Rectify Problem
(B) Free of discarded materials and trash

*Dust - Utilize Treated Cloths/Mops
** Painting - Touch Up As Required; Cycle Painting Within THREE YEARS
***Graffiti - To Be Removed Without Delay

16. Security facilities II.

Locker Rooms
Showers & Toilet Area

>

FREQUENCY SCHEDULE
 
D/2
D
W
M/2
M
Q
S/A
A
A/R
Lock/Unlock Area

X







Check & Close Windows  
X
             
Check & Replace Missing Signage  
X
             
Check & Replace Burned Out Lights  
X
           

Remove Cobwebs




X
 



Police Area (B)  
X
             
Empty Waste Containers
X

             
*Dust and Spot Clean Ceilings




X




Clean Walls and Disinfect  
X
     

     
Clean Floors  
X
     


   
Clean Mirrors  
X



       
Clean Sinks, Urinals & Water Closets

X







Clean Tile Walls

X







Clean Toilet Stalls/Partitions

X







Clean & Shine Chrome  
X
             
Clean Light Fixtures    


X
     

Clean Exhaust Vents  


 
X
       
Clean Painted Walls    
X
         

Clean Painted Doors & Frames    
X
         

Resupply Paper, Soap & Hygiene Products
X








Wash Windows Exterior/Interior            
X

 
Disassemble, Clean & Reassemble Light Fixtures              
X
 
Report Any Damage or Hazards (A)
X

             
**Painting                
X
***Graffiti                
X

REPORT DRIPPING/RUNNING WATER

(A) Clean and Rectify Problem
(B) Free of discarded materials and trash

*Dust - Utilize Treated Cloths/Mops
** Painting - Touch Up As Required; Cycle Painting Within FIVE YEARS
***Graffiti - To Be Removed Without Delay

17. Miscellaneous facilities.

Employee Lounge/Lunch Room
Sick Room
Training Rooms & Media
Holding Cells
Children's Center


FREQUENCY SCHEDULE
 
D/2
D
W
M/2
M
Q
S/A
A
A/R
Lock/Unlock Area

X







Check & Close Windows  
X
             
Check & Replace Missing Signage  
X
             
Check & Replace Burned Out Lights  
X
           

Police Area (B)

X



 



Remove Cobwebs        
X
       
Empty & Clean Waste Containers  
X
             
Empty & Clean Ash Receivers  
X
             
*Dust High Ceiling and Walls






X


*Dust Light Fixtures  


 

 
X
   
*Dust Walls, Decorations & Containers          
X
     
*Dust/Clean & Arrange Furniture  

     
X
     
*Dust Window Sills, Doors & Frames  

X


       
*Dust & Adjust Window Blinds/Shades


X






*Dust Radiators & Covers


X






*Dust Mop/Sweep Floors

X







Spray Buff Floors (1)


X






Strip & Refinish Floors






X


Spot Clean Walls & Paritions    

 
X
     

Spot Clean Glass, Doors & Frames    
X
           
Clean Mirror  
X
       

   
Clean/Polish & Arrange Furniture






X


Clean Sink & Shine Chrome  
X
         

 
Clean Door Saddles    
X
           
Clean Exhaust Vents        
X
       
Repair/Replace Flooring

             
X
Resupply Paper & Soap Products  
X
             
Wash/Clean & Adjust Blinds/Shades              
X
 
Wash Walls & Partitions              
X
 
Wash Glass, Doors & Frames            
X
   
Wash Windows, Exterior/Interior            
X
   
Disassemble, Clean & Reassemble Light Fixtures              
X
 
Report Any Damage or Hazards (A)  
X
             
**Painting                
X
***Graffiti                
X

Turn Off Lights When Appropriate

(A) Clean and Rectify Problem
(B) Free of discarded materials and trash

(1) Includes: Sweep, Damp Mop, Spray Buff and Dry Mop

*Dust - Utilize Treated Cloths/Mops
** Painting - Touch Up As Required; Cycle Painting Within FIVE YEARS
***Graffiti - To Be Removed Without Delay

18. Garage building, parking areas


FREQUENCY SCHEDULE
 
D/2
D
W
M/2
M
Q
S/A
A
A/R
Police Area (B)

X



 



Sweep Entryways  
X
   

       
Sweep Steps  

X
           
Sweep Landings  

X
           
Empty Litter Containers
X








Check/Clean Catchbasins & Drains  

X
 

 

   
Check/Replace Burned Out Lights  
X
     

     
Check/Report Missing Signage  
X
     

     
Check/Report on Insect/Rodent Control  
X



       
Check/Report Erosion



X





Check/Report Roof Fan Operation


X






Check/Report Fire Apparatus


X






Check/Report Missing/Broken Apparatus


X






Check/Report Any Deterioration of Paved Surfaces


X






Report Abandoned Equipment/Autos  
X

 

     

Maintain Snow Free Walks/Entryways                
X
Maintain Clear Passage for Vehicles    

         
X
Hose & Scrub Down Entry Areas  

   
X
 

 

Report Any Damage or Hazards (A)                
X
**Painting                
X
***Graffiti                
X

Turn Off Lights When Appropriate

(A) Clean and Rectify Problem
(B) Free of discarded materials and trash

* Painting - Touch Up As Required; Cycle Painting ANNUALLY, e.g. Benches, Metal Doors, Frames, Traffic Markings, Etcetera
**Graffiti - To Be Removed Without Delay

(e) Section II - Maintenance Standards

I SCOPE OF INSPECTION

Facility personnel should perform a complete inspection at least quarterly covering all areas of occupied and unoccupied court space (records storage areas), public areas, grounds, utility systems, equipment and materials storage space.

The primary purpose of the quarterly inspection is to evaluate the physical condition of the facilities and the equipment in order to gain information to establish a progressive maintenance program.

Correction of deficiencies found in the course of the inspection should be limited to emergency and minor items.

II SCHEDULING

The inspection should be scheduled to ensure that each facility will be observed at the most appropriate season, e.g., inspection of lawns and plantings during the growing season and the heating plant just before the heating season.

The structure's interior and envelope can be inspected year round, except for roofs when there is snow. Stagger inspection of the structure throughout the year so that correction of found deficiencies will not fall too far behind inspections.

Inspections of the structure's interior should be completed as far as practicable in one visit.

Mechanical areas and related equipment (pumps, refrigerator units, motors, compressors, heating and air conditioning units should be inspected within reasonable periods of time.

Inspection of items involving health and safety should not be limited to a quarterly basis, but should be made as frequently as necessary to avoid danger to the public and court personnel.

III EXTERIOR

A. Grounds

The entire perimeter of a court facility area should be surveyed systematically paying particular attention to the following: (See Section I - Frequency Cleaning Schedules, Table T-1).

1. Lawns (turf areas)

Establish a formal program of lawn care using the standards of the New York State Department of Parks. Look for density of grass; relative coverage desirable to undesirable growth; bare spots; adequacy of drainage; degree and quality of maintenance, e.g., mowing, watering and fertilizing.

2. Plants (trees, shrubs, hedges and vines)

Look for character of growth; shape and structure; injurious disease and insect infestation; degree and quality of maintenance; e.g. pruning.

3. Paved areas (streets, roads, drives, walks, sitting areas, cut curbs, gutters and traffic markings)

Look for cleanliness; failures in the surface and base; settlement; adequacy of drainage facilities; degree and quality of maintenance and condition of expansion joints.

4. Yard drainage (catch basins, inlets, ditches, pipe lines and swales) Look for flat undrainable or eroded areas; stoppage by rubbish and silt; adequacy as to capacity to meet peak demand; degree and quality of maintenance.

5. Grounds appurtenances (benches, posts, fences, guard rails, railings, lighting, retaining walls steps, flag poles, street signs, handicap signage and related equipment).

Look for worn out, damaged, or missing parts, lack of paint or other surface covering; degree and quality of maintenance and services; corrosion at the ground line of metal posts; rotting of wood members; jagged or sharp edges of posts; branches and twigs protruding over walked areas and hanging at eye level or other hazardous conditions.

B. Snow Removal

(1) Vehicles and related equipment should be in good mechanical condition, winterized and maintained in accordance with manufacturer's specifications.
(2) Procedures should be developed and standardized to meet climatic conditions and the court facility's needs.

IV BUILDINGS

A. Structures

Maintain a visual inspection of the buildings for evidence of cracks, joint sealant failure, breaks, deterioration, settling, etc. Any indication of any structural problem should be brought to the attention of the municipality immediately. The exterior appearance of structures must be maintained at levels which are indicative of good building management practices.

For garage buildings and parking areas see Sec. I, Frequency Cleaning Schedules T-18.

B. Roofs

The maintenance program should be implemented by semi-annual inspections of all roofs.

C. Hardware (Exterior Doors) Hardware, door-checks and other operating mechanisms of exterior doors should be inspected in the spring and fall. Changes in temperature necessitate adjustment of door checks. Lubrication of components should be carried out on a regular basis. Automatic doors require special services which should be handled by the manufacturer's maintenance organization.

D. Interior of Facility

1. Painting and decorating

Examine walls, ceilings, window sashes, trim, doors, closets and other painted surfaces for flaking, peeling, alligatoring, mold markings, wear, discoloration and dirt. Note any cracking, flaking or other damage in plaster or sheetrock covering of walls and ceilings. Inspect windows and door frames for cracking or missing putty and caulking, tightness and drying. Check doors and windows for proper operation.

The right combination of colors can build efficiency in an office as color can complement lighting, thereby relaxing tensions, improving morale and decreasing absenteeism. Colors should not be distracting or disturbing, as this diverts attention from work. Light pastel colors are generally recommended for interior wall surfaces, but it is preferable to use warm colors for rooms which receive little or no sunlight.

2. Floors

Look at floors noting scars, worn areas, broken or loose tile, torn or worn carpet, condition of linoleum; need to vacuum, shampoo, clean and wax; indentation by furniture, evidence of water under floor covering and condition of baseboards or cove molding.

3. Window shades, blinds, draperies

Examine for damaged and worn shades, cords and tapes; defective springs or mechanisms; broken or missing parts; torn, dirty or missing drapes.

4. Space heating equipment

If heating is by means of radiators or convectors, check for cleanliness and freedom from lint and dust; see that valves and traps are operative and do not leak water and that convector covers are properly anchored.

5. Plumbing fixtures & related hardware

Look for any breakage or chipping; easy and complete closing of faucets leakage; proper level of filling in water closet tanks or time flush valves on commodes and urinals; loose cracked or broken toilet seats.

6. Electrical Wiring

Inspect fuses/circuit breakers to see that they have not been tampered with and are not oversize or overloaded. Check all ceiling lights, switches and outlets for broken cover plates, loose connections, missing screws, etc. Inspect occupant-owned appliances and lamps for any frayed cords, broken plugs, or other potentially hazardous elements, i.e., cords running under carpets or across floor surface.

7. Hardware (Interior doors) Loose and missing lock and passage sets, hinges, panic bar hardware, door silencers, stops are the most overlooked items. The improper chocking open of doors, removal of pins, stops, silencers, screws and strike plates can cause safety hazards and failure of hardware. Loose or missing hardware should be reported immediately.

V ELEVATORS AND ESCALATORS

A. Elevators

Elevator inspection and maintenance requires the services of highly-trained mechanics; control systems of the new automatic elevators require the services of electronic technicians. The condition of floors and sills at landing should be given particular attention, with shafts and pits to be inspected monthly, by the maintenance contractor or a responsible employee. Accumulation of lint on rails, guides or car frame should be removed at once since it constitutes a fire hazard. The same concerns hold for the accumulation of debris in the pits and behind hoistway doors. All elevator cars should be checked periodically to verify that required inspection certificates are posted and up to date.

B. Escalators

Escalators should be checked at the beginning of each day to determine that travel directions are correct and that no hazardous conditions exist. Particular attention should be given to the removable floor panels over the machinery compartments to be sure that no tripping hazards exist.

Escalators should be checked and cleaned each day with particular attention given to handrails, combplates, treads and risers.

A record of accidents which occur on escalators should be maintained. These records should contain all available details pertaining to possible cause and brought to the attention of the escalator manufacturer on a regular basis. A review of accident records may reveal a pattern indicating a need for modification in design or operations.

VI UTILITY SYSTEMS

Air distribution systems must be kept as clean as possible in order to maintain safety and efficiency of operation. Special attention should be given as prescribed below to parts of these systems in order to fulfill that purpose.

A. Inspection and Cleaning of Ducts

Inspection of the ducts should be made in the spring and fall. Cooling and heating coils should be cleaned.

B. Fresh Air Intake

The intakes should be checked at time of duct inspection. Accumulated debris should be removed immediately.

C. Filters

Filters should be inspected, replaced or cleaned in accordance with manufacturers recommendations.

The controls for the HVAC, heating and cooling systems should be inspected to ensure proper operation at the beginning of the heating and cooling seasons.

The controls for the HVAC, heating and cooling systems should be calibrated by a qualified professional yearly.

Repairs and replacement of all controls should be done by qualified technical staff.

D. Fire Doors and Dampers

These should be examined at a minimum of once a year.

E. Maintenance of Machine Rooms

Keep machine and equipment rooms painted, clean and free of foreign objects.

F. Power Distribution-Electrical Systems

All electrical installations must be made in compliance with the National Electrical Code or state and local codes, where applicable.

G. Fans and Fan Motors

Fans and fan motors should be inspected at least quarterly and cleaned and lubricated in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.

H. Lighting Maintenance

Lamps (fluorescent and incandescent) should be cleaned and replaced on a regular basis.

Regular periodic inspections should be carried out to ascertain if any defective or unsafe conditions exist; including, special attention to exterior illumination of buildings, entrance ways, walks and parking areas.

Particular attention should be given to utilizing energy saving fixtures and relamping products.

I. Emergency Lighting and Power System

The emergency lighting and power system is installed to prevent panic and provide maintenance or security in the event of conventional power failure. Emergency systems must be completely dependable by frequent testing.

J. Fire Protection

Scheduled periodic inspections must be made in order to test fire protection equipment. The frequency of these inspections will generally be regulated by either local fire regulations or codes or the requirements of the National Fire Protection and American Insurance Association, whichever is more stringent.

Visual inspection of standpipes, hoses, smoke detectors, sprinkler systems, fire extinguishers and other equipment should be made to assure that they are being maintained, serviced and properly recorded on a timely basis.

Potential or actual fire hazards should be reported as soon as they are discovered.

VII MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS

A. Government Owned Property

Certain equipment maintenance and building services are furnished to the court by private vendors who have contracts with the municipality. It is the responsibility of the municipality to see that prearranged schedules for performance of these services are properly observed and that all work is satisfactorily completed with as little interruption to court processes as possible.

Special attention should be given to the careful wording of the performance specifications, the areas of responsibility and the required examination frequency schedule. The contractor should specify in the contract the type of staffing to be used for the work as well as the extent and method of their supervision. A schedule of costs on a unit basis for any additional services which may be required should be furnished by the contractor. The quality of the materials and equipment to be used on the work should be specified. The cost, method of payment and notice of termination of the agreement should be precisely defined.

Localities should have contract compliance and documentation procedures in place to monitor the level of performance, the quality of achievements, safety and other relevant factors.

B. Leased Space - Privately Owned Property

The following should be incorporated into leases providing space to the Unified Court System:


1. The custodial cleaning frequency standards as established by the Unified Court System should appear in their entirety.
2. The method of performing the tasks should be described carefully.
3. The nature of the chemicals and materials to be used or not used should be specified.
4. The nature of the staff should be controlled due to the sensitivity and security factors of the court system, i.e.:
a. The contractor shall submit a master employee roster to the local court administrator. If there are any changes in the roster, the contractor will be responsible to submit an up-dated roster immediately.
b. Each and every employee of the contractor will be required to prominently display an identification badge at all times while on court premises.
c. The local court administrator has the right to reject and bar from the facility any employee hired by the contractor.
d. A full time supervisor will be at the facility during the hours custodial work is being performed.
5. The provider is to schedule the starting time of air conditioning and heating equipment to maintain a proper working and energy efficient environment.
6. In the event any repair is found to be necessary, the building manager is to apprise the court in writing. The work should be progressed in stages and in such manner as to not interfere with the functioning of the courts and with
the utmost regard for the safety and convenience of its personnel and the general public.
7. Replacement of all burned out lamps and starters shall be made promptly on call from the court.
8. Repairs should be completed within a specified period of time.

C. Contractor - Failure to Perform

A penalty clause for the contractor's failure to perform the work should be specific as to the court's rights, e.g.

The contractor agrees that in the event any of the services provided for under the terms of this contract, should in any way be omitted or unsatisfactorily performed by the contractor and/or his employees, the court shall so notify the municipality and the contractor in writing of the deficient services for immediate correction. In the event the contractor does not correct the deficient services after receipt of the written notice to correct, the Office of Court Administration (OCA) shall request that the municipality deduct a percentage, based on the work not performed or performed unsatisfactorily as determined by the provider, from the voucher for their services rendered for that contract period. If the contractor continues to omit contracted services and or performs unsatisfactorily, then the court shall notify the municipality and the contractor to correct the neglected or deficient services within five (5) days from the date of the notice. Should the contractor fail to correct the deficient services, OCA will then arrange with the municipality for the work to be done by another contractor and the cost of such work shall be deducted from any monies due or may become due to the contractor.

VIII UTILITIES STANDARDS

The following standards are based on existing energy conservation regulations established by federal, state and local agencies.

Hot water temperature control devices should be set to achieve results not to exceed the greater of the following: 105 degrees F. or the lowest setting on the control device.

The following general illumination levels should be maintained:

Office

50 foot candles

Corridors

15 foot candles

Storage Areas

10 foot candles

Prolonged or visually difficult tasks

75 foot candles

In specific areas such as court rooms and well areas a higher illumination level is desirable.

A standard air temperature of 78 degrees F. in the summer and 68 degrees F. but not to exceed 75 degrees F. in the winter should be the average room temperatures.

IX OTHER MAINTENANCE CONSIDERATIONS

A. Water

Water should be potable for drinking purposes and pure from chemical or metallic elements that are injurious to human health, equipment and plumbing system.

Where practicable, localities should install separate water meters for court facilities which will allow for cost identification and establishment of programs for conservation of water.

B. Electricity

Lighting fixtures and ceilings should be clean to allow for maximum light reflection.

Consideration should be given to providing separate independent light switches for certain rooms and areas which may result in large electrical savings.

A study should be conducted to evaluate the efficiency of older fixtures.

Maximum use should be made of natural light to help reduce the need for additional electrical illumination. Windows should be regularly cleaned to allow for maximum penetration of natural light to save electrical energy.

Localities should consider using the Power Authority of the State of New York (PASNY) which offers reduced rates to local government.

C. Heating and Air Conditioning - Climate Control

Heating and air conditioning is an important element in the proper operation of a building by providing a reasonable comfort level of environment to users. In addition to electricity, some facilities use gas or oil for heating which also represents a major cost factor in the operation of facilities.

Energy surveys of buildings should be conducted to identify loss of heated or cooled air and to determine corrective actions. Old leaking windows and doors, broken panes, loose caulking, etc. should be repaired.

Municipalities should consider the possibility of installing separate meters or oil tanks to enable identification of costs related only to court facilities.

Historical Note
Sec. filed Jan. 30, 1978; repealed, filed Feb. 2, 1982; new filed Nov. 2, 1989; amds. filed: July 18, 1994; July 18, 1996 eff. June 28, 1996. Amended (a), (c).

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Section 34.2 Reimbursement for cleaning of court facilities.

(a) Purpose. The purpose of this section is to give effect to the provisions of section 39-b of the Judiciary Law.

(b) Definitions. For purposes of this section, the definitions set forth in section 34.1(c) of this Part shall apply. In addition, the following terms shall have the meanings herein provided:

(1) The term court facilities shall mean facilities for the transaction of business by the State-paid courts and court-related agencies of the Unified Court System and the judicial and nonjudicial personnel thereof, including rooms and accommodations for the courts and court-related agencies of the Unified Court System, the judges, justices and the clerical, administrative and other personnel thereof.

(2) The term cleaning of court facilities shall mean those services and activities that are necessary to insure that the interior of each court facility is and remains a clean and healthful environment in which to transact the business of the Unified Court System. These services and activities include, but are not limited to: removal of trash and debris; maintenance of appropriate standards of hygiene; painting; pest control; and replacement of consumable items such as light bulbs, soap, toilet paper and paper toweling. They also shall include the making of minor repairs.

(3) The term minor repairs shall mean such repairs as are required to replace a part, to put together what is torn or broken, or to restore a surface or finish, where such repairs will preserve and/or restore a court facility to full functionality; and shall include only:

(a) painting, carpeting, and other resurfacing of, or finish work related to, or renovation of, the interiors of spaces used by the unified court system and

(b) a uniform percentage of other building maintenance costs, said percentage to be established for each state fiscal year by the chief administrator. The chief administrator may set a different percentage for a particular political subdivision upon a showing that minor repairs constitute a greater percentage of other building maintenance costs in that political subdivsion than the uniform percentage established by the chief administrator.

(4) The term political subdivision shall include each county of the State outside the City of New York and each city of the State.

(c) Contracts with political subdivisions.

(1) Each political subdivision shall enter into a contract with the Unified Court System pursuant to which such political subdivision shall provide for the cleaning of court facilities located therein and the state shall reimburse the political subdivision for its actual expenditures therefor.

(2) Each contract entered hereunder shall require the political subdivision:

(i) to comply with the maintenance and operation standards for court facilities prescribed by section 34.1 of this Part; and

(ii) annually, on a form to be prescribed by the chief administrator of the courts and in accordance with such deadline as he or she may fix, to submit to the chief administrator a proposed itemized budget scheduling those expenditures it projects it will incur during the State fiscal year commencing April 1st next thereafter for the cleaning of its court facilities.

(3) The chief administrator shall review each proposed itemized budget submitted pursuant to paragraph (2) of this subdivision. Following such review, he or she shall notify the political subdivision submitting such budget of the expenditures scheduled therein that have been approved. To the extent practicable, such notification shall be given not later than March 1st preceding commencement of the State fiscal year in which the expenditures are to be incurred.

(4) Notwithstanding the foregoing, the State shall not reimburse a political subdivision for any expenditure during a State fiscal year for the cleaning of its court facilities where:

(i) the need therefor is due to the political subdivisions failure to follow generally accepted preventive maintenance policies and procedures; or

(ii) such expenditure is incurred to pay for cleaning that is undertaken in lieu of replacement of a building system that, in accordance with the political subdivisions normal and usual policies, procedures and practices, should be replaced; or

(iii) such expenditure was not approved for such fiscal year pursuant to paragraph (3) of this subdivision, unless the need therefor was triggered by a sudden and unexpected failure or by some accident or external force, resulting in a situation that adversely affects the suitability and sufficiency of the court facilities for the dignified transaction of the business of the courts, in which event the State shall reimburse the political subdivision for the amount of the expenditure up to $15,000 (and, notwithstanding any other provision of this section, the political subdivision may include any unreimbursed balance of the expenditure on the proposed itemized budget it submits for the next State fiscal year pursuant to paragraph [2] of this subdivision); or

(iv) pursuant to the laws, rules and regulations to which the political subdivision is subject, and its own normal and usual policies, procedures and practices, such expenditure is being or could be bonded.

(5) Where a political subdivision incurs an expenditure for the cleaning of a court facility that is part of a combined occupancy structure, as that term is defined in section 1676 of the Public Authorities Law, and such cleaning benefits portions of the structure used for purposes not directly or indirectly related to the function of the court facility, the State shall reimburse the political subdivision only for so much of the expenditure as can be attributed to its benefit to the court facility.

Historical Note
Sec. filed Jan. 30, 1978; repealed, filed Feb. 2, 1982; new filed Jan. 20, 1998; amd. filed Jan. 6, 1999 eff. Dec. 15, 1998. Amended (b)(3).

Amended 34.02(b)(3) on March 21, 2007

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Section 34.3 to 34.7 [Repealed]

Historical Note
Secs. filed Jan. 30, 1978; repealed, filed Feb. 2, 1982 eff. Jan. 1, 1982.